Monthly Archives: April 2021

Zzz! Sound sleep was a major challenge for Indian adults during lockdown

The article was carried in all editions of The Free Press Journal on April https://www.freepressjournal.in/health/world-health-day-2021-indians-grapple-with-new-sleep-challenges

23% women in Mumbai are prone to anaemia while 27% men are predisposed to diabetes, reveals Indus Health Plus Survey

World Health Day: The study’s overall sample size in Maharashtra was 21,500 people while that for Mumbai was 2,978. These people underwent preventive health check-ups between October 2019 and February 2021.

Mumbai, April 7, 2021: On the occasion of World Health Day, Indus Health Plus Survey revealed that people in Maharashtra are susceptible to diabetes (27%), Vitamin B12 Deficiency (23%), dyslipidemia (17%), obesity (13%) followed by heart diseases (10%) and anaemia (10%). The key non-modifiable risk factor is the genetic makeup of an individual favoured by environmental, age, gender, stress and physiology, metabolism, which increases the onset and progression of lifestyle diseases. 

The study’s overall sample size was 21,500 people who underwent preventive health check-ups between October 2019 and February 2021. From Mumbai, the total sample size was 2,978 people. It was observed that the Mumbaikars are predisposed to diabetes (25%), dyslipidemia (18%), Vitamin B12 deficiency (16%), obesity (15%), followed by anaemia (14%) and heart diseases (12%). 

Amol Naikawadi, JMD, and Preventive Healthcare Specialist, Indus Health Plus, says, “Diabetes and cardiovascular diseases are prevalent in India. These diseases tend to impact people in the most productive years of their lives and result in social and economic consequences. Another important aspect is that comorbid conditions such as diabetes, obesity, and heart diseases are high-risk conditions for COVID-19. Hence, proper management to keep them in control is vital, especially in this situation.” 

Measures to boost immunity

  • Get enough sleep
  • Eat more healthy fats and whole plant food
  • Stay hydrated
  • Take a probiotic supplement
  • Limit added sugars
  • Engage in moderate exercise
  • Manage stress
  • Maintain good hygiene
  • Avoid smoking and alcohol
  • Don’t consume excessive saturated fats

The trend report highlights that women are prone to anaemia (23%) and dyslipidemia (20%) compared to men. Men are at higher risk of diabetes (27%), Vitamin B12 deficiency (21%)and heart ailments (14%). 

The data gives us an insight into individual health needs to be taken very seriously. Health means physical, social, mental wellbeing with absence from diseases. Therefore, ensure regular health check-ups and follow-ups, personalized diet and lifestyle goals need to be set and followed, and strong immunity to protect from diseases. 

“While exposure to the SARS-Cov-2 virus remains the most decisive factor determining the chances of getting COVID-19, other possible factors may influence the response to infection. These risk factors include reduced immunity, presence of existing comorbidities, and age. The genetic variants can influence the response to COVID-19 by regulating the immune function that can make an individual less or more vulnerable than others. Therefore people must understand the value of prevention and continue to invest in timely and routine examination to monitor comorbidities and keep them at bay,” adds Naikawadi. 

The main focus of people should be on wellness and prevention of lifestyle diseases and to create a culture of healthy living among the younger generation. The best way to minimize the cost of treating lifestyle diseases is to invest in preventive healthcare, which accounts for a fraction of the money spent on corrective steps.

CATEGORYNo. of MEN: 1436 No. of WOMEN: 1542 Total: 2978
In %In %In %
ANAEMIA5%23%14%
DIABETES – F BSL27%23%25%
DYSLIPIDEMIA – TOTAL CHOLESTEROL16%20%18%
HEART PROBLEM – CT CORONARY ANGIOGRAPHY14%9%12%
OBESITY16%13%15%
VITAMIN B 1221%12%16%

You are cordially invited to attend the wedding of dugwell and banyan tree

King Sri Krishnadevaraya wanted to organise the wedding of his royal well to find his wise advisor Tenali Rama, but a well is also wedded off in a colourful custom prevalent in Bihar and Jharkhand. 

The last you would have heard of a well’s wedding was in the folklore of Tenali Rama. Once upon a time, it had so happened that King Sri Krishnadevaraya and his wise advisor Tenali Rama had a spat over some trivial issue, following which the King banished him from the royal court. After this episode, Tenali Rama left the kingdom and moved to a nondescript village. Soon, the King realised that Tenali Rama was, in fact, correct, and he was keen to have him back in his court. But his special advisor was nowhere to be found. To look for him, the King had to use his wits. An announcement was made saying that the King had organised the royal well’s wedding in his capital Vijayanagar on the full moon night, and the village panchayats in his kingdom were cordially invited to attend the same with their wells in tow. The King wouldn’t tolerate any defiance, and if the villagers failed to bring their wells along for the wedding, they would be penalised 100 gold coins. The harried villagers sought Tenali Rama’s advice. He suggested that they meet the King the following day and tell him that the village wells would attend the wedding for sure, but only if the royal well comes and invites them personally. The King knew that it could be only his witty courtier Tenali Rama, who could give the villagers this suggestion to outwit the King’s proposed well’s wedding plan, and well, eventually both won the battle of wits in equal measure.  

Taking a leaf out of this folklore, a quaint neighbourhood — Vikas Nagar — in Ward no 8 of the Barh subdivision of Patna district organised a wedding of its well with great pomp and show on November 28, 2019.

Sharmila Kumari, Vikas Mitra of Ward no 8, Barh.
Read more here: https://en.gaonconnection.com/well-wedding-jharkhand-bihar-water/

Dealing with COVID stress is not a child’s play

Dr Jesal Sheth tells how parents can chip in and help their children bust it.

New Delhi, April 1, 2021: The COVID19 pandemic and subsequent lockdown generated a lot of fear and stress across all age groups. Children usually thrive under predictable conditions, but the pandemic’s disruption greatly impacted them physically and emotionally. Online schooling, social isolation, lack of interactions with their friends, lack of physical sports and parental angst have aggravated their mental and emotional wellbeing. Children and adolscents have developed fear, anxiety, depression, and boredom. While most parents were involved in dealing with the pandemic’s uncertainty and putting all efforts to keep their family safe and sustainable, the emotional needss and mental health of children were somehow ignored.

THE IMPACT OF THE PANDEMIC ON CHILDREN: The pandemic has changed the way children typically grow, learn, play, behave, interact, and manage emotions. Children have been observed to have conduct problems, peer problems, externalizing problems, and general psychological distress. When compared with children who did not exercise, children with psychical activity had lower hyperactivity-inattention and less prosocial behavior problems.

Moreover, from a more emotional perspective, they have a lot going around in their head, and the biggest worry for them is whether or not they will see their friends in school or get sick. The combined effect between lifestyle changes and psychosocial stress caused by home confinement perhaps aggravates children’s behavioural problems.

In the long run, this can lead to an emotional breakdown among children, and the same may lead to these children resisting to return to school post-lockdown. This can happen primarily because children have lost their pre-lockdown routines and the loss of touch with their peers and mentors. In addition to this, the lockdown-related constraints can have a long-term negative effect on their overall psychological wellbeing.

SO, HOW DO WE TACKLE THIS? Here’s how you can help children cope with COVID-related stress;

  • Address fears: Anxiety and emotional depression can be tackled by parents to some extent by addressing fears of children, talking about problems and possible solutions from the child’s perspective.
  • Spend time with grandparents: Children who have grandparents can spend some quality time with them, listen to stories and tell them stories. Talking to them will help.
  • Follow a routine: Parents can maintain some routines even if confined at home. It is always good if parents and children can plan some activities together. Parents should also plan their children’s tasks one at a time, involve them in various home activities, educate them about following hygiene habits and social distancing.
  • Play games: Engage in indoor play and creative activities. In addition to these activities, children can be advised to be involved in household chores and understand their social responsibilities.
  • Organise virtual play dates: To keep them in touch with friends and classmates, plan a virtual party and playdates.
  • Discuss issues: Parents should pay more attention to the emotional wellbeing of the child. Keep emphasizing COVID19 measures like wearing a mask, social distancing, and frequent hand washing, as the pandemic is not over yet. Also, children should be encouraged to socialize with their friends and classmates through digital forums under the parent’s supervision.

(Dr Jesal Sheth is Senior Consultant-Paediatrician, Fortis Hospital, Mulund; Cover image by Tumisu from Pixabay